“Ok Boomer”-love the sensitive snowflakes

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“Ok Boomer”-love the sensitive snowflakes

The infamous Bob Lonsberry tweet comparing

The infamous Bob Lonsberry tweet comparing "OK Boomer " to the n-word.

Photo courtesy of Bob Lonsberry's Twitter

The infamous Bob Lonsberry tweet comparing "OK Boomer " to the n-word.

Photo courtesy of Bob Lonsberry's Twitter

Photo courtesy of Bob Lonsberry's Twitter

The infamous Bob Lonsberry tweet comparing "OK Boomer " to the n-word.

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The relations between the younger and older generations have been becoming increasingly hostile and aggressive. Baby Boomers blame the Millennials for killing industries and giving out participation trophies, while the Millenials retaliate by criticizing the Boomers for being out of touch with the modern age. In recent years, however, the Boomers have added Gen Z, the generation of activism, existentialism, and memes, to the equation by portraying them as phone addicts with the attention span of a goldfish, thus giving birth to the cultural phenomenon of “OK Boomer.”

The phrase “OK Boomer” took the Internet by storm on the app TikTok, where users rebutted Baby Boomer rants about the failings of the younger generations. The meme extended to teens recounting relatable and annoying encounters they’ve had with Boomers, rebuking their behavior accompanied by the song “OK BOOMER” by Peter Kuli and Jedwill.

“OK Boomer” is the collective sigh of the younger generations. It is dismissal to all the pushback and hostility of the Baby Boomers. Gen Z’s attempt to get the Boomers to care about the issues plaguing society and concern for the future has become so exhausting and underproductive, that rather than endlessly defend their stance in a painstakingly long and pointless argument, the teens and younger adults are simply done.

In the New York Times article that brought the phrase to the Boomer’s attention, Nina Kasaman, a teen entrepreneur who profited off of “OK Boomer” merchandise, said, “Everybody in Gen Z is affected by the choices of the Boomers, that they made and are still making. Those choices are hurting us and our future. Everyone in my generation can relate to that experience, and we’re all really frustrated by it.”

As one can predict, the Baby Boomers did not take to the meme well. Conservative talk-show host and Boomer, Bob Lonsberry, tweeted “‘Boomer’ is the n-word of ageism. Being hip and flip does not make bigotry OK, nor is a derisive epithet acceptable because it is new.”

First of all, to quote John Maloney, “No, it is not. Do you know why I know it’s not? Because you are using the word “midget” (or in this case, “Boomer”), and not using the n-word.” To compare OK Boomer to the n-word is not only ignorant of the suffering and oppression of African-Americans, but also a pathetic attempt to victimize the generation that has attacked and belittled the youth. It is ironic how the Boomers call the younger generations “sensitive snowflakes” when they cannot handle a meme.

The Boomers have pillaged the economy by repeatedly cutting their own taxes and financing two wars with deficits, contributed to institutionalized racism, and ignored climate change, leaving future generations to clean up the mess they created. Still, if a teenager dyes their hair or advocates for a better world, they are suddenly the reason for the collapse of society. OK Boomer.