Uncovering the Maze

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Uncovering the Maze

Stairs in the Maze leading up to the Skier Dome.

Stairs in the Maze leading up to the Skier Dome.

Photo by Jenny Ellis

Stairs in the Maze leading up to the Skier Dome.

Photo by Jenny Ellis

Photo by Jenny Ellis

Stairs in the Maze leading up to the Skier Dome.

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AHS’s curving hallways, round science wing, and large basement make it unique. Students at AHS have given the equally confusing lower level the nickname of “The Maze”. It is called this because of its twisting hallways and confusing design. Some students don’t even know what is down there.

Many students think the Maze doesn’t seem to hold anything interesting or even have a reason to explore it. It is just thought of the abandoned downstairs of the high school. Few classes inhabit the lower level, so students rarely have a reason to go down to the labyrinth unless enrolled in one of those classes or for sports.

AHS Senior Karen Galvan has limited experience in “The Maze.”

“I’ve been down a couple of times, but I don’t really go down there unless it’s during the sports season,” said Galvan.

Another AHS student Lily Jacobson, a sophomore, explained what a student like herself, who doesn’t play a sport for the school, would use the maze for.

“I think mostly I’ve just been down there when I’m in the gym, but I haven’t really been there much at all,” Jacobson said.

With students rarely using the maze in their daily lives, could the Maze be revamped to be more useful to students? Lupita Ortiz, a Junior atAHS, thinks the maze isn’t as useful to the students as it could be.

“I don’t think we use it frequently enough, and it is kind of confusing. Especially when you are a freshman, you never go down there because you think you won’t find your way out,” she said.

The Maze seems to only be a useful place for athletes, staff, and building equipment. There has to be a place for the building’s functioning equipment and breakrooms for staff, but students feel there could be more useful ways to use the space for educational purposes.

“The Maze has a few useful functions, no doubt, but I think it could be improved upon,” Galvan added.

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